Fairfax Custody & Relocation Attorneys

Given the state of the economy, more and more parents are having to consider relocating. Some need to relocate for a better job. Others may desire to relocate to be closer to the financial and emotional support network that extended family can provide.

When a parent who has primary custody of a child wishes to relocate in such a way that it has an impact on the parental rights of the other parent the court may prevent relocation.

The court will look to serve the best interests of the child. Everything will be viewed through that lens. Whether you are seeking to relocate or you are opposing relocation, you need to be able to frame the facts of the case through the best interests of the child to be able to persuade the court of the validity of your position.

AV Preeminent Rated* by Martindale-Hubbell's Peer Review Rating System

At the law firm of Kearney, Freeman, Fogarty & Joshi, PLLC, our Fairfax relocation attorneys understand how to present the facts of your case with that perspective in mind. We have been providing strong family law representation to our clients for decades and we will use that experience to help you achieve your goals regarding relocation.

Contact our Northern Virginia Divorce Lawyers

When you are considering relocating with your child or if you need help opposing your child's other parent relocating with him or her, we can help you utilize the power of the court to achieve your goals. Turn to the experienced Fairfax family law attorneys of Kearney, Freeman, Fogarty & Joshi, PLLC, in Fairfax, Virginia. To schedule your initial consultation, call 877-652-1553, or contact us online. We accept Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover as well as offering a variety of payment options for our clients' convenience.

 

*AV Preeminent and BV Distinguished are certification marks of Reed Elsevier Properties Inc., used in accordance with the Martindale-Hubbell certification procedures, standards and policies. Martindale-Hubbell is the facilitator of a peer review rating process. Ratings reflect the confidential opinions of members of the Bar and the judiciary. Martindale-Hubbell ratings fall into two categories: legal ability and general ethical standards.