Answers to Common Questions About Divorce and Family Law in Virginia

Divorce, child custody disputes, and other legal issues that affect your family naturally leave you with a lot of questions about your rights and your options for moving forward. In our FAQ archive, our experienced divorce and family law attorneys offer easy-to-understand answers to some of the most common questions, as well as helpful tips for navigating the legal process. If you don’t see the answer to your question here, don’t hesitate to contact us in person at 877-652-1553.

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  • Is my spouse’s substance abuse problem relevant in our divorce?

    Substance abuse may be relevant to some aspects of your divorce agreement or court decree. Therefore, you should share your spouse’s substance abuse problem with your divorce lawyer as soon as possible. Substance abuse and divorce

    Substance Abuse as Grounds for Divorce

    Substance abuse is not listed as a statutory reason for an at-fault divorce in Virginia. However, if substance abuse leads to a felony conviction, puts you at risk for physical harm, or causes your spouse to desert you, it could be a reason for a fault-based divorce. Otherwise, substance abuse may be the reason that you seek a no-fault divorce.

    Since you can seek a no-fault divorce in Virginia, grounds for divorce may not be your primary concern. Instead, you may be worried about the details of your divorce.

    How Substance Abuse Impacts a Divorce

    In most cases, your spouse’s alcohol or drug addiction will not affect alimony, division of marital property, or division of marital debt. However, if your spouse spent a significant portion of your family money on drugs or alcohol or incurred debt because of his addiction, it could impact alimony and the division of marital assets and debts.

    Substance abuse is more likely to impact child custody and visitation. The courts decide child custody issues based on the best interests of the child and not what is equitable for the divorcing spouses. Therefore, if you can prove that it is not in your child’s best interests to spend time with a parent who abuses drugs or alcohol, you may be able to prevent your child from spending unsupervised time with the parent who is not always sober.

    If you’re worried about your children’s safety due to your spouse’s substance abuse, our experienced family law attorneys will help you obtain a fair and legal divorce settlement that protects your kids. To learn more, please fill out our online contact form, or call us today.

     

  • Do I have to be legally separated from my spouse before getting divorced in Virginia?

    Virginia, unlike many other states, does not recognize “separation” as a legal status in a no-fault divorce. Therefore, there is no special designation that you need from the court in order to be legally separated before you seek a divorce. Separation before divorce in Virginia

    You Still Need Proof That You Were Separated

    In order to get a no-fault divorce in Virginia, you must either be separated from your spouse for one year or, if you have no minor children, be separated from your spouse for six months with a separation agreement in place.

    Without a formal separation designation from a court, you will need to prove the date which you separated. Generally, Virginia courts consider the date of separation to be the date on which one of the spouses decided that the marriage was over and informed the other spouse of that decision. This may have been done through a conversation or in writing (typically, via email or text).

    If the date of separation is in dispute, the court may consider things such as:

    • Whether there is a voluntary settlement agreement that is dated and signed
    • When you and your spouse began to identify yourselves as separated to family and friends
    • Whether you continue to attend events or go out together
    • Whether you live in the same house and, if you do, whether you share a bedroom

    If there are grounds for divorce such as adultery, desertion, or cruelty, there are legal options that are not used in a no-fault divorce case. For example, either spouse may request temporary relief from the court to resolve immediate issues of child custody, spousal support, and use of the marital home. Additionally, a spouse may file for a limited divorce—known as a divorce from bed and board. If a divorce from bed and board is granted, neither party may remarry or legally engage in sexual relations with anyone else.

    Voluntary Separation Agreements

    While Virginia law does not typically require separation agreements, the spouses may choose to negotiate a separation agreement that resolves issues such as child custody, child visitation, spousal support, use of marital property, and property division pending a final divorce.

    If you are interested in entering a voluntary separation agreement or establishing a clear date of separation from your spouse, it is important to contact an experienced divorce lawyer as soon as possible. Our lawyers understand that the decisions you make now will significantly affect you and your family. We will always listen to your concerns, provide you with honest advice, and help you make a realistic plan to achieve your goals. Contact us today.